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Curtain Rod Sizes (Dimensions Guide)

Here’s our guide to curtain rod sizes including a rod size chart, different curtain rod diameters and how to measure for curtain rods.Waterfront living room with flowing curtains bronze rodAmong your last tasks when decorating your home is dressing your windows. The first thing that comes to mind is choosing the correct fabric for your curtains. And rightly so. 

Curtains help in keeping your room private, prevent dust, dampen noise, and are decorative. But for your fabric to drape beautifully on your window, you also have to decide on your curtain rods. Durability and design are points to consider in curtain rods, but having the right curtain rod size also matters. 

How you dress your window depends on its dimensions and the style you want to evoke. A long rod on a narrow window and vice versa can look disproportionate and distract from the overall beauty of your interiors.

We take the spot-light on a window essential that is not getting as much attention as it should: curtain rod and its many sizes.

Standard Curtain Rod Sizes 

Curtain rod different sizesCurtain rod sizes differ from each other to match varying window sizes. By that logic, standard curtain rod sizes follow standard window sizes.

The advantage of having standard window sizes is that drapes and rods are widely available. There is no more second-guessing on what size to get or where to purchase them. In short, standard sizes are all-around convenient.

So, what are the standard sizes for each window type? 

Windows are either single-hung, picture windows, sliding windows, and more. However, the most common window is a double-hung window measuring 24 inches, 28 inches, 32 inches, and 40 inches wide.

Since standard window sizes cover a wide range, most curtain rods in the market are adjustable. For each curtain rod size, there is a minimum and maximum length.

You can read our article on standard window size for a complete guide. 

Standard curtain rod sizes

24 to 48 inches curtain rod: This length is appropriate for small windows like in your laundry area, guest bathrooms, or narrow windows.

48 to 84 inches curtain rod: If you have a picture window or a side-by-side double-hung window, then you can order this size to hang your curtain. 

66 to 120 inches curtain rod: Got large windows to cover? Patio glass doors, French doors, and custom picture windows beyond 100 inches wide will benefit from a 66 to 120 inches curtain rod. 

120 to 170 inches curtain rod: This is more common in large interiors with high ceilings and expansive windows. Think of large picture windows, bay, and bow windows, to name a few.

Since this rod is longer than the rest, install a bracket or two to hold the curtain rod and prevent it from sagging.

Curtain Rod Size Chart 

Below are the following popular curtain rod sizes according to different window widths:

WINDOW WIDTH (Maximum) CURTAIN ROD SIZE
36 inches 24 to 48 inches
72 inches 48 to 84 inches
108 inches 66 to 120 inches
158 inches 120 to 170 inches

As a way of reinvention, modern homeowners customize more home elements, including their door and window openings.

That said, you can have your curtain rods personalized according to the material, design, and length you require. You can also combine two adjustable rods or splice two fixed rods using a connector.

Different Curtain Rod Diameters 

Curtain rod diametersSimilar to choosing the length of your curtain rod, its diameter is also crucial. Too thin, and it can be flimsy. Too thick, and it will look bulky.

Curtain rod diameter sizes range between a half-inch to three inches, varying according to its material and the weight of your fabric. Heavier fabrics need thicker rods and sturdy brackets.

For wood curtain rods, the diameters available are between 1 ⅜ inch and three inches. Whereas wrought iron, hollow rods, and other metal rods are more flexible and have thinner options than wood. Metal rod diameters include ½ inch, ¾ inch, ⅝ inch, all the way to three inches.

What Size of Curtain Rod Do I Need? 

With all the window types, sizes, and other numbers mentioned above, you might think that selecting a curtain rod is complicated. But the process is far from it. The crucial part of choosing a curtain rod is for it to be proportionate to your window.

How to Measure for Curtain Rods

Brown curtain with metal rodStart with your windows. If you are putting up curtains in multiple windows, it is best to measure each one of them twice. Better be precise to avoid inconveniences. Using a meter or a measuring tape, check the width from frame to frame or casement to casement. 

If you want to open your curtains and end within the window opening, measure from frame to frame. For more sunlight to come in, you can take advantage of the width of the window by measuring from casing to casing.   

You can refer to the curtain rod chart above to see which length you need. 

TIP: Your curtain rod should be at least 10 to 20 inches longer than the width of your window. 

How Many Inches Should the Curtain Rod Be Away from the Window? 

Window to curtain rod distanceWindows with  blackout curtains and black rod.

Now that you have your correct curtain rod size, it is time to install them above your window.

Your curtain rod should appear balanced. To achieve this, make sure that your curtain rod is centered and has the same excess length on both ends of the window opening.

As a general rule, affix your curtain rod four to six inches above your window. This way, you avoid hanging your curtains too low or too high. Consider the type of bracket or rod support you’ll be using, as they come in different shapes and sizes as well.

If you have a small space with more than enough ceiling height, you can raise your curtain rods higher. Some even install them as high as three inches away from the ceiling.

A favorite interior design trick, doing this makes a small room appear large and your windows taller, as it draws your eyes vertically.

Need more tips? Browse our curtain-related article about how to choose the right curtain color on this page.

 

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