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Types of Pegboard Hooks (Tool Racks & Storage Holders)

This guide to the different types of pegboard hooks includes methods for hanging tools & hardware, how pegboard hooks are measured, hole sizes and how much weight a pegboard can hold.
Pegboard with different hooks and toolsWhen shopping for pegboard hooks, you’ll notice many types of pegboard hooks, as well as pegboard holders and pegs. These pegboard hooks come in a variety of shapes and sizes, which can be confusing, especially for first-time users.

While there are no clear-cut rules when it comes to which pegboard hooks to use, it’s beneficial to know the types of pegboard hooks and their recommended use, so you have more time to organize than choose.  

The following guide lists the different types of pegboard hooks, and they are recommended and best used when organizing tools.

J Hook

J hook

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Named after its profile, the J-hook is usually used individually for hanging necklaces, keys, ropes, storage bags, and many other items. The J-hook tool has an upward curve, and where the items hung rest at the bottom of the hook.

You can align two to three j hooks horizontally on a pegboard to hold longer items such as brushes, hammers, wrenches, and the like as look as they can fit on the inner loop. 

It is one of the most common pegboard hooks easily in most Home Depot and hardware shops. The standard sizes are ¼, 3/16, or 1/8-inch hole diameter with a 1/4 inch or less thickness; they can be made from metal or plastic. The largest metal J-hook can hold up to around 10 pounds. 

Look for a J-hook with a locking mechanism at the back of the hook, which is an extra projected arm inserted in the hole for secondary support. 

Angled L Hook

Angled L pegboard hooks

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The angled L hook is another popular type of pegboard hook that is also named according to its shape and is characterized by having a wide straight projecting arm. This wider profile allows you to hang on items with larger widths, such as tapes, handsaws, coiled wires, and the like.

Similar to your J-Hook, make sure to look for Angled L Hooks that have a back tab so you can ensure that the pegboard hook won’t fall out when getting the tools from your pegboard. 

Align several angled L hooks in one horizontal row to carry longer items such as poles, golf clubs, brooms, etc. With a wider arm, you’ll find it easier to grab items quickly. 

Ring Tool Holder

Ring tool pegboard hooksSee this ring tool holder at Amazon [sponsored link]

Sifting through your toolbox for hand tools such as screwdrivers, wrenches, and chisels can be a headache, especially if you’ve got a large collection. Organizing your hand tools on a pegboard will save you much time and prevent damage and rusting of your tools.

The best pegboard hook for hand tools is the ring tool holder, which is characterized by having a two-ringed prong that is fastened to your pegboard with a U-shaped end. 

There are ring tool holders that come in sets that are secured on a metal rack. This way, you can easily line up similar hand tools of different sizes. 

Double hook

Double pegboard hooksSee this double hook at Amazon [sponsored link]

As the name implies has a pair of arms where hand tools such as pliers, wrenches, and hammers can be inserted in-between as long as you have a larger width. The double hooks generally come with closed looped ends or open ends.

Aside from long straight arms, you’ll also find double hooks with J-hook, angle hooks, and curved hooks. Use double hooks with protective round nylon endings to prevent dents or scratches on your tools. The double arm is also great for holding down heavier items. 

Multi-Tool Rack

Multi-tool rack pegboard hooksSee this multi-tool rack at Amazon [sponsored link]

The multi-tool rack pegboard holder is a series of hooks that allow you to line up tools in one row. With the pegboard hooks rack, organizing items on your pegboard is easier when you wish to move around items. Typically, you’ll find them 9 inches wide which will fit into your pegboard similarly to your 1/4″ thick pegboard hooks. 

When you have a collection of the same tool but different sizes, the multi-tool rack is a sensible option, plus you’ll find suppliers offering lower prices compared to purchasing them individually. 

There are multi-tool rack pegboard holders for ring hooks which are great for screwdrivers, multi-tool rack pegboards for curved hooks that are great for wrenches, and multi-tool rack doubles straight prongs for spoons or spatulas. 

Pliers Holder

Pegboard pliers holderSee this plies holder at Amazon [sponsored link]

Pliers are one of the most useful hand tools at home; having them stored properly to prevent them from rusting while being readily available is important.

The pliers holder, as its name implies, is shaped to hold different types of pliers. This elongated U shape allows the pliers to be hanged upside down with the handles securely held against the two arms. 

As great as Ring Tool Holders are, some tools still don’t fit into them too well. The ring attachments are great for screwdrivers, but other tools are shaped differently and don’t quite fit into them.

Shelf Bracket

Pegboard shelf bracketSee this shelf holder at Amazon [sponsored link]

The shelf bracket has a projected arm with an angled edge where the sheet or board securely rests. This type of pegboard hook mainly supports the shelf where items such as paint cans, bins, and other tools can be placed freely without being hanged or clipped on a pegboard hook. 

The shelf bracket comes in a variety of lengths with typical standard depths of 4 inches or 8 inches. The angled edge of the projected arm allows you to place any flat surface or shelf, preventing it from slipping but can be easily removed when needed. 

Screw Bin

Screw binSee this screw bin at Amazon [sponsored link]

The screw bin is a useful container that allows you to organize smaller items such as nuts, bolts, nails, clips, and washers.

You’ll find these bins typically made from durable plastic material in a variety of sizes. The typical size for your screw bin is 4″ x 5″ x 3″ for medium-sized screw bins and 4″ x 7″ x 3″ for the larger bins. 

Steel Tray

Steel TraySee this steel tray at Amazon [sponsored link]

The steel tray is perfect for organizing containers such as paints, solvents, plants, and any other canned or bottled items. The steel material prevents it from rusting and can hold a heavier weight.

Typically, these trays come with a 20-gauge Type 304 stainless steel and standard sizes of 2 inches or 4 inches wide and in various lengths.

A common steel tray pegboard hook will have a 1-inch front lip that will prevent items from sliding through. Pre-drilled mounting holes are available for the steel tray so you can easily secure the tray on your pegboard. 

Paper Towel Holder

Paper TowelSee this paper tower holder at Amazon [sponsored link]

A challenge in organizing in tool rooms and even kitchens is where to place paper towels that will make it roll or release their rolled paper without toppling down or the end paper from getting caught on the rest of the items on the pegboard. 

The Paper towel holder comes with two arms secured from the pegboard extending in a looped end. Paper towel holders come with one hand that ends with a slight angle on the tip. You’ll also find the one-hand paper towel holder with a rounded nylon end to prevent damage to your paper towels when replacing them.

You’ll also find this type of pegboard hook with extendable versions that allow you to adjust the length to accommodate the size of your paper towels. 

How Are Pegboard Hooks Measured?

Big steel pegboard with different tools zip tie holderPegboard hooks are available in two sizes, the 1/4 inch and 1/8 inch, which refers to the diameter of the wire used to construct them. The hook sizing refers to the diameter of the wire that was used to make the peg hook.

The smaller 1/8-inch pegboard hooks can be used in the bigger 9/32-hole pegboard holes; however, the 1/4-inch pegboard hooks cannot be used in the smaller 3/16-hole pegboard. 

⅛” (0.1 – 0.12 inch)

¼” (0.2 – 0.24 inch)

The typical pegboard has a hole diameter of 9/32 inches. However, you’ll also find pegboard that comes with holes that are precisely 1/4 inches in diameter.

This pegboard can also be 1/4 inches wide in depth. If the diameter of the hook is similar to its hole’s diameter and the pegboard has a specified depth, you won’t be able to fit the hook into the hole.

Since the peg hook’s pegs are curved, the hook requires a space allowance to correctly go through the 14-inch hole. 

How Big Are Pegboard Holes?

Pegboard hole sizesThe standard ¼-inch pegboard has two standard hole sizes, namely 1/8″ to 3/16″, which are considered small holes, and the ¼” to 9/32″, which are considered big holes. The ¼” pegboard hole is the most common. 

These holes are spaced 1″ apart, measured from center to center of the hole. 

How Far Off The Wall Does The Pegboard Need To Be?

The recommended space for pegboard is around 1/2 inches or 1.27 cm. of standoff space behind it so the hooks can be inserted. Both the plastic and metal pegboard panels have built-in space.

If you are designing a garage layout you can use one of the popular software programs to determine how much space you have available for different storage, tools and items

How Much Weight Can A Pegboard Hook Hold?

Most standard pegboard hooks can carry medium loads of 15 pounds. There are heavy-duty pegboard hooks that can carry up to 20 pounds. 

Aside from the pegboard hook’s carrying capacity, buyers should also consider the pegboard carrying capacity as well. The typical 3/16 pegboard is able to hold up to 100 lbs. of weight. 

Tip: For heavier items, place them at the strongest part of your pegboard, which is usually the middle areas, as the weak spots are typically on the sides where the pegboard is fastened against the wall. 

Visit our workbench backsplash ideas for more related content.

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