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Standard Window Sizes (Size Charts & Dimensions Guide)

Welcome to our guide to standard window sizes including size charts for popular types and dimensions.
Living room with single hung windows and small window seat Homes that are 30 to 50 years old are typically fitted with standard window sizes that apply to many types and shapes of windows.

Manufacturers have defined measurements for each kind of window in several sizes. However, whether you’re shopping for new home windows or replacement windows makes a tremendous difference when ordering.

A new home build has window openings precisely measured and the windows, generally standard sizes, fit in the rough opening with little to no adjustments.

Whereas replacement windows, even if they’re standard sizes, may mean more adjustments need to be made to the existing opening. Knowing what to expect before ordering windows saves a lot of time and money for any homeowner.

This guide contains information about standard window sizes and the many variations you may encounter when purchasing windows. Included at the end, is a section on how to measure windows and a handy list of FAQ’s.

What Is A Standard Window Size?

Kitchen sliding pass through window above sink When shopping for windows, it’s just as important to know the individual sizes of the windows on your home as the manufacturer’s standard window sizes.

However, starting with the standard sizes allows a foundation to perform accurate measurements. Today’s window suppliers provide a numeric, replacement window size to help homeowners identify the correct windows. This window sizing process is known as the window size notation.

As an example, a standard single hung window that is 2-feet, 9-inches wide, and 3-feet, 4-inches high would include a size notation of “2934.” The window size notation includes four numbers; the first two digits represent the width and the second two digits represent the height.

These notations are the manufacture’s measurements with an additional ½ inch less or more to provide room for installation. For example, a “4444” size notation represents a window 44-inches wide and 44-inches tall.

Standard sliding pvc window The actual measurement may be 43 ½-inches wide by 44 ½-inches high. The ½-inch provides room for flashing materials and ensures the window opens and closes easily.

Another way a window size is noted is with an actual size of 29.5-inches wide and 35.5-inches high and a common size of 30-inches wide and 36-inches high.

The common size is the standard window size and both these sizes may be found in the windows listed specifications and label. Some manufacturers may use their own size notation numbers so always check with the sales clerk before you buy.

Standard Window Width – The most common window is a double hung window, which slides up and down, found on many homes. The width of these windows includes the standard measurements of 24-inches wide, 28, 32, and 40-inches.

Standard Window Height – The same window’s standard height includes 36-inches, 44, 52, 54, and 62-inches. (See more in the window size charts below.)

Below are the standard window sizes for the different types of windows. When measuring for custom windows, it helps to begin with these common sizes.

Double Hung Window Sizes

and

Single Hung Window Sizes

WINDOW TYPE STANDARD  WIDTHS STANDARD HEIGHTS SIZE NOTATIONS
Double Hung Window Standard Sizes and Single Hung Window Standard Sizes

(They measure the same for standard sizes)

 

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

36-in

44-in

48-in

52-in

54-in

60-in

62-in

70-in

2030

2038

2040

2044

2046

2050

2052

2060

Double hung window 28-in

28-in

28-in

28-in

28-in

28-in

28-in

28-in

36-in

44-in

48-in

52-in

54-in

60-in

62-in

70-in

2430

2438

2440

2444

2446

2450

2452

2460

Single hung window 32-in

32-in

32-in

32-in

32-in

32-in

32-in

32-in

36-in

44-in

48-in

52-in

54-in

60-in

62-in

70-in

2830

2838

2840

2844

2846

2850

2852

2860

  40-in

40-in

40-in

40-in

40-in

40-in

40-in

40-in

36-in

44-in

48-in

52-in

54-in

60-in

62-in

70-in

3430

3438

3440

3444

3446

3450

3452

3460

  44-in

44-in

44-in

44-in

44-in

44-in

44-in

44-in

36-in

44-in

48-in

52-in

54-in

60-in

62-in

70-in

3830

3838

3840

3844

3846

3850

3852

3860

  48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

36-in

44-in

48-in

52-in

54-in

60-in

62-in

70-in

4030

4038

4040

4044

4046

4050

4052

4060

Picture Window Sizes

WINDOW TYPE STANDARD  WIDTHS STANDARD HEIGHTS SIZE NOTATIONS
Picture Window Standard Sizes

 

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

12-in

18-in

24-in

36-in

48-in

52-in

60-in

72-in

96-in

2010

2016

2020

2030

2040

2044

2050

2060

2080

Picture window 36-in

36-in

36-in

36-in

36-in

36-in

36-in

36-in

36-in

12-in

18-in

24-in

36-in

48-in

52-in

60-in

72-in

96-in

3010

3016

3020

3030

3040

3044

3050

3060

3080

  48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

12-in

18-in

24-in

36-in

48-in

52-in

60-in

72-in

96-in

4010

4016

4020

4030

4040

4044

4050

4060

4080

  60-in

60-in

60-in

60-in

60-in

60-in

60-in

60-in

60-in

12-in

18-in

24-in

36-in

48-in

52-in

60-in

72-in

96-in

5010

5016

5020

5030

5040

5044

5050

5060

5080

  72-in

72-in

72-in

72-in

72-in

72-in

72-in

72-in

72-in

12-in

18-in

24-in

36-in

48-in

52-in

60-in

72-in

96-in

6010

6016

6020

6030

6040

6044

6050

6060

6080

  96-in

96-in

96-in

96-in

96-in

96-in

96-in

96-in

96-in

12-in

18-in

24-in

36-in

48-in

52-in

60-in

72-in

96-in

8010

8016

8020

8030

8040

8044

8050

8060

8080

Single Slider Window Sizes

WINDOW TYPE STANDARD  WIDTHS STANDARD  HEIGHTS SIZE NOTATIONS
Single Slider Window Standard Sizes 36-in

36-in

36-in

36-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

3020

3030

3040

3050

Sliding window 48-in

48-in

48-in

48-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

4020

4030

4040

4050

  60-in

60-in

60-in

60-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

5020

5030

5040

5050

  72-in

72-in

72-in

72-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

6020

6030

6040

6050

  84-in

84-in

84-in

84-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

7020

7030

7040

7050

Casement Window Standard Sizes

WINDOW TYPE STANDARD  WIDTHS STANDARD HEIGHTS SIZE NOTATIONS
Casement Window Standard Sizes 12-in

12-in

12-in

12-in

12-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

30-in

1616

1618

1620

1626

1656

Casement window 14-in

14-in

14-in

14-in

14-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

30-in

1816

1818

1820

1826

1656

  18-in

18-in

18-in

18-in

18-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

30-in

2016

2018

2020

2026

2056

  24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

30-in

2616

2618

2620

2626

2656

  30-in

30-in

30-in

30-in

30-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

30-in

3016

3018

3020

3026

3056

Bay Window Sizes

Bay window with curtains The size of the window opening determines how a bay or bow window is configured. Bay and bow windows can be made from casement windows, double hung, and fixed windows. Fixed windows are typically used when the window is just for appearances.

A bay window or bow window that opens is preferred in living rooms, kitchens, and bedrooms for air circulation. Bay and bow windows are sized according to the existing rough opening and made with several sashes.

The difference in standard sizes for bay and bow windows are based on the angle of the windows and size of the three sashes. Typically, the middle sash is ½ the total width of the window and the two side sashes are ¼ the window width.

WINDOW TYPE TYPE & ANGLE STANDARD SIZES

Middle Window width
and Side Windows width

Projection from Outside Wall
Bay Window Standard Sizes and Projection from Wall

 

30-Degree 3-sash Bay

 

36-in 18-in 10 -in
48-in 20-in 11 7/8-in
60-in 24-in 13 1/8-in
72-in 30-in 16 7/8-in
Bay window 45-Degree 3-sash Bay 36-in 18-in 15 3/8-in
48-in 20-in 16 3/4-in
60-in 24-in 19 5/8-in
72-in 30-in 23 7/8-in

Awning Window Sizes

WINDOW TYPE STANDARD WIDTHS STANDARD HEIGHTS SIZE NOTATIONS
Awning Window Standard Sizes 12-in 12-in 1616
  14-in

14-in

12-in

14-in

1816

1818

  18-in

18-in

18-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

2016

2018

2020

Awning window 24-in

24-in

24-in

24-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

2616

2618

2620

2626

  30-in

30-in

30-in

30-in

12-in

14-in

18-in

24-in

3016

3018

3020

3026

Standard Bedroom Window Sizes

Standard bedroom windows sizes are larger than years ago to allow more light and fresh air in the room. There are standard sizes found in new home builds and existing homes.

Below are the sizes and include either single hung windows or double hung windows, the most common types used in bedrooms. Other types of bedroom windows include sliders.

WINDOW TYPE STANDARD WIDTHS STANDARD HEIGHTS
Bedroom window Sizes 24-in 36-in
Bedroom window 24-in 46-in
28-in 54-in
28-in 66-in
28-in 70-in
34-in 46-in
34-in 62-in

Bathroom Window Sizes

There aren’t any tried and true standard bathroom window sizes besides the standard single hung and double hung windows whose size depends on the location and size of the bathroom.

As a general rule standard bathroom picture windows range from 24″ to 96″ wide and 12″ to 96″ high.  A standard bathroom sliding window ranges from 36″ to 84″ wide and from 24″ to 60″ high. 

Master bathroom with picture window above tub shiplap walls white vanities Many bathroom windows are associated with privacy meaning small sizes. However, depending on the size of the bathroom, location of the window, and type of window, bathroom window sizes vary. Bathrooms present much less working space than other rooms in a home.

When possible, the largest size window should be chosen for a bathroom to allow more natural light and air flow. If a bathroom is on a second or third floor and is out of view from onlookers or neighbor’s windows, a large bay or bow window is a great choice.

Many homes use glass block windows or frosted glass above a jet tub or in a shower providing extra privacy. Typical bathroom windows include single hung and double hung windows.

A great design element in a bathroom is adding several windows such as a horizontal block of transom windows or two single hung windows side-by-side with wall space in between.

Short, wide casement windows are great to add to the upper part of a shower when privacy is needed and a short, wide slider works as well.

Window Sizes Frequently Asked Questions

Should I replace all my windows at once or can I replace a few at a time?

Casement window with double tilt and turn It may save money up front to replace a few windows but it will cost more if the entire house needs windows replaced.

Buying all the windows in one order provides seller discounts and the cost of labor to install the windows is lower when the whole house is done in one job.

In order for the window installers to be at your home, bring the required equipment, and manage work schedules, one complete job costs less.

What season is the best to have replacement windows installed?

Warm weather is always preferred for replacement installation. Once the existing windows are removed, cold and inclement weather poses troubles. If the weather is too hot, such as summers in the high deserts of Arizona, the intense heat will infiltrate your home.

Any extreme temperatures may cause caulking for sealing the windows to not perform well leading to possible air leakage later.

Vinyl and aluminum windows, if exposed to extreme heat or cold, will expand. This may cause gaps between the rough opening and window frame after the temperatures return to a moderate level.

Can I install my replacement windows myself?

If you’re a licensed contractor and have plenty of experience, the answer is yes. If you’re a DIY homeowner, it’s not recommended.

White vinyl replacement window Are Replacement Windows The Same Size As New Construction Windows?

Replacement windows present some challenges new construction windows do not. New home builds mean precut window openings, professional builders, and proper fitting.

Replacement windows involve precise window measurements with the possibility of adjustments once the windows are purchased. The rough opening for new windows includes nailing fins when the window is installed.

Replacement windows, although water tight, do not require or include nailing fins possibly allowing some water infiltration.

Always use replacement windows for existing homes. Once a window is taken out, other elements that are affected include the wall, trim, and siding causing a new construction window to not fit properly.

Replacement windows slide into the existing window space and typically only require some trim adjustments. This ensures a better fit. We’ve written an article about replacement vs new construction windows here.

How To Measure For Replacement Windows

On the Energy.gov website, the result of improperly fitting windows causing air leaks leads to a large amount of energy loss.

“Heat gain and heat loss through windows are responsible for 25%–30% of residential heating and cooling energy use.” (Source: Energy.gov)

Purchasing the right size windows means preventing energy loss and reduces monthly heating and cooling costs.

Measuring for replacement windows isn’t as difficult as it may sound but if measurements are wrong, it will cost a high price when the windows you ordered don’t fit. If the company you’re purchasing the windows from offers free measurement services, let them do the measuring.

If you have to measure yourself, below are the steps to measure for replacement windows.

  • Check that the windows are square by holding a tape measure on the inside of the window in the top right corner. Pull the tape measure down to the bottom left corner and write down the measurement.Reverse this and measure from the top left to the bottom right. The window is square of the two measurements match or are within ¼-inch of each other. If not square, the frame will need to be adjusted.
  •  
  • Measure the width, not including the window trim, by placing the measuring tape on the left side inside jam and stretching it to the inside of the jam on the right side.Do this for three different spots on the window, middle and near the top and bottom, and use the largest number for the width.
  •  
  • To measure a window’s height, extend the tape measure from the sill to the top of the window opening. Do not measure from the trim board. The sill is where the window sash sits when closed.Do this measurement from the middle of the sill, the right, and the left sides. Take the largest number and this is the height of the window.

Always double-check your measurements and if possible, have someone else check them and compare the results.

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